ENG3U English Grade 11 Course Outline


ENG3U English Grade 11


Course Title: English, Grade 11, University Preparation
Course Name: English
Course Code: ENG3U
Grade: 11
Credit Value: 1.0
Prerequisite: English, Grade 10, ENG2D
Curriculum Policy Document: English, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2007 (Revised)
Course Developer: TorontoeSchool
Department: English
Department Head: Erin Weir, B.A.(Hon), B.Ed., OCT
Development Date: 2014
Most Recent Revised Date: 2020


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English 11 - ENG3U course extends students' experience with the English language. Students will further investigate literatures from multiple time periods and in various genres including prose fiction, poetry, drama and mixed media. They will explore the connections betweenform and content in literature while improving critical thinking skills. Students will learn the specifics of rhyme, meter, writing formal argumentative and editorialstyle pieces, as well as creative writing. This course will help students develop the skills required at the university level.

Unit Titles and Descriptions Time
1 Lord of the Flies
By the end of this unit, students will:
  • Write from the perspective of a character in the novel
  • Identify and define various literary devices
  • Write a formal essay
28 hours
2 Macbeth
By the end of this unit, students will:
  • Be able to analyze rhythm, meter and rhyme scheme
  • Complete a literary analysis
  • Compare characters and character development
  • Write an editorial-style opinion piece
26 hours
3 Canadian Poetry
By the end of this unit, students will:
  • Read poetry by several female Canadian authors
  • Complete a literary analysis of the poems
  • Write an original poem
  • Present their original poem in an oral presentation
22 hours
4 Media
By the end of this unit, students will:
  • Identify techniques used in propaganda/advertising
  • Compare present-day and historical techniques and aesthetics
  • Present their findings in an organized oral presentation
20 hours
5 Midterm Assignment
6 hours
6 Final Essay
6 hours
7 Final Exam
2 hours
Total 110 hours

 

Oral Communication
1. Listening to Understand: listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety of situations for a variety of purposes;
2. Speaking to Communicate: use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes;
3. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.
Literature Studies and Reading
1. Reading for Meaning: read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of literary, informational, and graphic texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning;
2. Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning;
3. Reading With Fluency: use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;
4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading.
Writing
1. Developing and Organizing Content: generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write for an intended purpose and audience;
2. Using Knowledge of Form and Style: draft and revise their writing, using a variety of literary, informational, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;
3. Applying Knowledge of Conventions: use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies, and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work effectively;
4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.
Media Studies
1. Understanding Media Texts: demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts;
2. Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques: identify some media forms and explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning;
3. Creating Media Texts: create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences, using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques;
4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters and creators, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in understanding and creating media texts.


As in a conventional classroom, instructors employ a range of strategies for teaching a course:

  • Clear writing that explains new concepts to students
  • Examples of full solutions in various contexts and opportunities to practice
  • Direct instruction and coaching on student work by the teacher

In addition, teachers and students have at their disposal a number of tools that are unique to electronic learning environments:

  • Electronic simulation activities
  • Video presentations
  • Discussion boards and email
  • Assessments with real-time feedback
  • Interactive activities that engage both the student and teacher in the subject
  • Peer review and assessment
  • Internet Instructional Videos

Oral communication is taught and assessed throughout the online course. Students are expected to access and participate actively in course work and discussion forums on a regular and frequent basis. This interaction with other students is a major component of this course and there are minimum requirements for student communication and contribution.


Students must achieve the Ministry of Education learning expectations of a course and complete 110 hours of planned learning activities, both online and offline, in order to earn a course credit. Students must keep a learning log throughout their course which outlines the activities they have completed and their total learning hours. This log must be submitted before the final exam can be written.

The chart below indicates some general examples of online and offline activities.

Online Learning Activities Offline Learning Activities
Watching instructional videos Reading materials for course
Watching additional resources videos Studying instructional material
Completing online timed assignments Practicing skills
Contributing to Forums Completing assignments
Uploading video presentations Completing essays
Communicating with instructor Preparing presentations
Participating in live conferences Reviewing for tests and exams
Practicing through online quizzes Researching topics on internet
Reviewing peer submissions  
Assessing peer presentations  
Completing online timed exam